Gregory Bender

Looplifter

Moto Guzzi V700, V7 Special, Ambassador, 850 GT, 850 GT California, Eldorado, and 850 California Police models

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Tom Short's Looplifter

Tom Short provided these pictures of his Looplifter. The Looplifter fits right inside the existing lips on the jack.

Tom Short's Looplifter.

Tom Short's Looplifter.

Photo courtesy of Tom Short.

Tom Short's Looplifter.

Tom Short's Looplifter.

Photo courtesy of Tom Short.

Tom Short's Looplifter.

Tom Short's Looplifter.

Photo courtesy of Tom Short.

Tom Short's Looplifter.

Tom Short's Looplifter.

Photo courtesy of Tom Short.

Tom Short's Looplifter.

Tom Short's Looplifter.

Photo courtesy of Tom Short.

My copy of Tom Short's Looplifter

Having purchased a Craftsman motorcycle jack (Sears Craftsman item #00950190000 - purchased on sale for USD $69.99), I created my own version of the Looplifter. I used scrap iron I had leftover from another *failed* project. Specifically, I used 1 inch angle iron for the rectangular frame and 34 inch angle iron for the support that comes into contact with the bottom rail of the motorcycle frame. I chose to make each support adjustable by welding two 516 inch nuts at each corner. I also drilled a hole through the bottom of each corner so that the 516 inch bolt could screw through the bottom of the rack. As you can tell, I'm not a professional welder, but it is strong.

The jack.

The jack.

Photo courtesy of Gregory Bender.

Removing the rubber pads.

Removing the rubber pads.

Photo courtesy of Gregory Bender.

Rubber pads removed.

Rubber pads removed.

Photo courtesy of Gregory Bender.

Looplifter bolted to jack.

Looplifter bolted to jack.

Photo courtesy of Gregory Bender.

Looplifter bolted to jack.

Looplifter bolted to jack.

Photo courtesy of Gregory Bender.

Close up of adjustable support, electrical tape used to protect frame. The electrical tape didn't work very well, I quickly switched to using pieces of old rubber inner tube.

Close up of adjustable support, electrical tape used to protect frame. The electrical tape didn't work very well, I quickly switched to using pieces of old rubber inner tube.

Photo courtesy of Gregory Bender.

Looplifter painted black.

Looplifter painted black.

Photo courtesy of Gregory Bender.

Charlie Mullendore's Looplifter

Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle provided these pictures of the Looplifter that he was given by Pat Galbraith. The Looplifter is of unknown origin.

Charlie Mullendore's Looplifter.

Charlie Mullendore's Looplifter.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Charlie Mullendore's Looplifter.

Charlie Mullendore's Looplifter.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Bill Dudley's Looplifter

Thanks to Bill Dudley who posted this information on the Yahoo! Loopframe_Guzzi news group. In Bill's own words:

I wanted a bike lift that didn't monopolize the shop, especially if it wasn't in use. I decided that a left over 2 ft × 8 ft piece of 34 inch plywood flooring would work, providing it was strengthened. I sourced two 8 ft pieces of 2 inch × 2 inch square steel tubing from the local metals shop. I determined they would be strong enough by standing on one of them and noting the deflection with my 190lb on it - not much, like 12 inch.

I bolted the steel tubing to the sides of the plywood, using eyebolts in four locations so I'd have someplace to attach tie-downs. At one end of the platform, I put a scrap of 2 inch × 10 inch, so that when the platform is sitting on the floor, it forms a ramp, where the middle of the ramp is just high enough to fit the Harbor Freight bike jack. A couple of furniture dolly wheels on the 2 inch × 10 inch allow the thing to be wheeled about (when empty) if needed.

Since the Harbor Freight bike jack only goes about 17 inch high, I cut down two saw horses to just under that (16 34 inch or so). To make loading easier, I added a little wedge of rubber to the low end of the lift to avoid the 34 inch step.

To put a bike on the lift:

  • Assuming platform is on the ground, put the HF bike jack under the center.
  • Roll the bike onto the platform and into the wheel chock.
  • Tie the bike down to the eyebolts on the platform.
  • Raise the platform using the HF bike jack.
  • Shove the little saw horses under the platform, approximately under the wheels of the bike.
  • Lower the HF bike jack and remove and store it.

The platform can be stored on its side when in use so it takes almost no floor space.

Ambassador on lift, sans rear end.

Ambassador on lift, sans rear end.

Photo courtesy of Bill Dudley.

Detail of front wheel in Harbor Freight wheel chock, with saw horse support.

Detail of front wheel in Harbor Freight wheel chock, with saw horse support.

Photo courtesy of Bill Dudley.

Detail of rear of lift on saw horse; note rubber ramp.

Detail of rear of lift on saw horse; note rubber ramp.

Photo courtesy of Bill Dudley.

Harbor Freight bike jack about to slide under the bike platform.

Harbor Freight bike jack about to slide under the bike platform.

Photo courtesy of Bill Dudley.

Harbor Freight bike jack in position under bike platform.

Harbor Freight bike jack in position under bike platform.

Photo courtesy of Bill Dudley.

Rubbish tip chair ready to receive mechanic.

Rubbish tip chair ready to receive mechanic.

Photo courtesy of Bill Dudley.