Gregory Bender

Model differences

Moto Guzzi V700, V7 Special, Ambassador, 850 GT, 850 GT California, Eldorado, and 850 California Police models

Created:

Updated:

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Like most things in life, these differences are not absolute. There was plenty of crossover as the models evolved and there are many exceptions. But, this can serve as a general guideline to the differences between V700, V7 Special, Ambassador, 850 GT, 850 GT California, Eldorado, and 850 California Police models. Some of the photos and information came from Dave Otis' old website. I'm certain I missed something, so please contact me with any corrections, contributions, or additional photos: greg@thisoldtractor.com.

Special thanks to Mike Tiberio, Rob Prins, Newtin, Paul Linn, Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle, Gordon Kline of MG Cycle, Sven Stepan, and Marty Ray for providing additional difference information.

  V700 V7 Special Ambassador 850 GT 850 GT California Eldorado 850 California Police
Imported into the United States directly from the factory

Yes

No

Yes

No

No

Yes

Yes

Engine Case

3 shallower vertical ribs

Photo courtesy of Dave Otis.

Photo courtesy of Dave Otis.

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Most had 3 deeper vertical ribs plus additional diagonal rib running rearward from cylinder base

Photo courtesy of Dave Otis.

Photo courtesy of Dave Otis.

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Very late had horizontal webbing

Photo courtesy of Dave Otis.

Photo courtesy of Dave Otis.

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Horizontal webbing

Photo courtesy of Dave Otis.

Photo courtesy of Dave Otis.

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Bore

80 mm

83 mm

Stroke

70 mm

78 mm

Displacement

703.717 cc

757.486 cc

844.05 cc

Piston rings

4, 3 above wrist pin, 1 below

4, all above wrist pin

3, all above wrist pin

Valves

38 mm intake and 34 mm exhaust

40 mm intake and 35 mm exhaust

Valve springs

Single

Dual

Compression Ratio

9:1

9.2:1

Maximum RPM

6000

6500

Horsepower at maximum RPM (SAE)

50

60

64

Cylinder head exhaust port

No boss for future exhaust studs

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Early models had no boss for future exhaust studs; later models had a boss for later exhaust studs

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Most had no boss for future exhaust studs; Some had a boss for later exhaust studs

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Cylinder head top stud

One piece design with o-ring

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Early models had one piece design with o-ring; later models had two piece design with crush washer

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Two piece design with crush washer

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Cylinder head valve guide casting

Thanks to Gordon Kline of MG Cycle for providing this difference information.

Valve guide casting is proud of the top of the cylinder head.

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

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Valve guide casting is level with the top of the cylinder head.

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

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Valve covers

Thanks to Charley Cole of Zydeco Racing for providing some of this difference information.

Early models had Moto Guzzi printed below raised area, no ridge on raised area, longer hex-head securing bolts

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

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Later models had Moto Guzzi printed on raised area, no ridge on raised area, shorter allen-head securing bolts

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

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Moto Guzzi printed on raised area, no ridge on raised area, shorter allen-head securing bolts

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

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Early models had Moto Guzzi printed on raised area, no ridge on raised area, shorter allen-head securing bolts

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

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Later models had Moto Guzzi printed on raised area, ridge on raised area, shorter allen-head securing bolts. There were two versions of this valve cover, one style appeared completely shiny while the other style appeared rough with only the raised area shiny. It is believed the shine was not the result of polishing, but rather the result of the manufacturing process.

MG# 12023502
MG# 12023502

Photo courtesy of Stein Dinse.

MG# 12023502

Photo courtesy of Stein Dinse.

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MG# 13023561
MG# 13023561

Photo courtesy of Stein Dinse.

MG# 13023561

Photo courtesy of Stein Dinse.

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MG# 13023561
MG# 13023561

Photo courtesy of Rob Anderson.

MG# 13023561

Photo courtesy of Rob Anderson.

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Gas tank - capacity

4.5 gallon

early models had 4.5 gallon

late models had 5.84 gallon

5.84 gallon

Gas tank - petcock position

Petcocks positioned forward

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

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Early models had petcocks positioned forward

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

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Late models had petcocks positioned rearward

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

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Petcocks positioned rearward

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

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Gas tank - tunnel width

Thanks to Karl Kologiski for providing this difference information. Note: Wider tunnel tanks will fit on the earlier models. Narrow tunnel tanks will not fit on the later models.

Narrow tunnel

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

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Early models had narrow tunnel

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

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Late models had wider tunnel

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

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Wider tunnel

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

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Gas cap

Cap with lever, lever secured via special boss on tank

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Early civilian models had cap with lever, lever secured via special boss on tank

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Later civilian models had a cap with a lever, lever secure via ring and groove on neck

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Police models had a screw-on cap, taller neck

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Push button release style, like was fitted to the 850 T

screw-on cap, taller neck

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Civilian models had a cap with a lever, lever secured via ring and groove on neck

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Police models had a screw-on cap, taller neck

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Screw-on cap, taller neck

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Front brakes

most had twin leading shoe

some very late models had four leading shoe (circa 1977)

twin leading shoe

most had twin leading shoe

some in 1973 had four leading shoe

late 1973 and 1974 had single disk

Forks

Early models were fit with a two leading shoe front brake. These models used fork lowers with a single retainer for the brake plate (on the left fork lower). These early fork lowers only used an axle pinch bolt on the left fork lower. The right fork lower did not have a pinch bolt for the axle.

Very late models (circa 1977) were fit with four leading shoe front brakes. These models used fork lowers with a retainer on each side for the the pair of brake plates.

Some models were fit with a two leading shoe front brake. These models used fork lowers with a single retainer for the brake plate (on the left fork lower). These fork lowers used an axle pinch bolt on both the left and right fork lowers.

Some models were fit with four leading shoe front brakes. These models used fork lowers with a retainer on each side for the the pair of brake plates (a right side fork lower from a two leading shoe front brake is identical in all other respects). These fork lowers used an axle pinch bolt on both the left and right fork lowers.

Some models were fit with a two leading shoe front brake. These models used fork lowers with a single retainer for the brake plate (on the left fork lower). These fork lowers used an axle pinch bolt on both the left and right fork lowers.

Some models were fit with four leading shoe front brakes. These models used fork lowers with a retainer on each side for the the pair of brake plates (a right side fork lower from a two leading shoe front brake is identical in all other respects). These fork lowers used an axle pinch bolt on both the left and right fork lowers.

Some models were fit with single disc brake. These models used entirely different forks with completely different components.

Rake

27°

Trail

56.94 mm

81.94 mm

Triple tree offset

90 mm

Photo courtesy of Dave Otis.

Photo courtesy of Dave Otis.

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Photo courtesy of Gerhard Ziesemann.

Photo courtesy of Gerhard Ziesemann.

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70 mm

Photo courtesy of Dave Otis.

Photo courtesy of Dave Otis.

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Photo courtesy of Gerhard Ziesemann.

Photo courtesy of Gerhard Ziesemann.

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Triple tree offset

Information from Gerhard Ziesemann:

I can assure you there is a 3rd type of triple trees with an inclined steering tube. Unfortunately I don't have a pic of that although (or because) I ride a set of these on my sidecar outfit. The only pics to show the three versions I have are of their upper ends with different positions for the steering tube.

Transmission speeds

4 speed

5 speed

Transmission gear ratios

1:2.230

1:1.333

1:0.954

1:0.750

1:2.000

1:1.388

1:1.047

1:0.869

1:0.750

Transmission case

Smooth

Ribbed

Transmission gear design

Earliest all straight cut, middle first straight cut/second-fourth helically cut, latest all helically cut

All helically cut

Rear drive gearing

8/37

8/35

8/37

Rear drive case

Star burst, polished

Star burst, polished

very late may have had the deeper sump, unpolished

Deeper sump, unpolished

Overall gear ratios (from engine through transmission to rear drive)

1:14.180

1:8.473

1:6.063

1:4.768

1:13.413

1:8.015

1:5.735

1:4.510

1:11.424

1:7.929

1:5.980

1:4.964

1:4.284

Carburetors

Dellorto SS1 29mm

later models had an intake liner to increase air flow velocity

Dellorto VHB 29mm

Dellorto VHB 29mm

Some were fitted with Amal 930 carburetors while the Dellorto factory was on strike.

Carburetor body to intake manifold clamps

Smooth polished aluminum band

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Early models had smooth polished aluminum band

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Later models had steel bands perpendicular to the carb body

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Steel bands perpendicular to the carb body

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Shifter design

Most had heel-toe, few had toe only

Heel-toe

Shifter location

Right side, had a different bend to clear the swing arm nut

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Left side

Rear brake design

Aluminum

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Chrome plated steel

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

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Rear brake plate

Shaft at 12 o'clock, shoe pivot doubles as tie rod attachment point

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Early had shaft at 12 o'clock, shoe pivot doubles as tie rod attachment point

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Later had shaft at 3 o'clock

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Shaft at 3 o'clock

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Rear brake location

Left side

Right side

Shift pattern

1 up, 3 down

1 up, 4 down

Headlight

Deep shell

Shallow shell

Tail light

Very early models used an entirely unique tail light which is exceedingly rare.

Photo courtesy of Sven Stepan.

Photo courtesy of Sven Stepan.

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Photo courtesy of Sven Stepan.

Photo courtesy of Sven Stepan.

Direct link to image

Photo courtesy of Sven Stepan.

Photo courtesy of Sven Stepan.

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Later models had additional horizontal mount to the frame, round lens

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Early models had additional horizontal mount to the frame, round lens

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

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Later models lacked additional mount, round lens

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

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Early models lacked additional mount, round lens

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

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Later models had a rectangular lens

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

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Instrument panel

Civilian models only had a speedometer See civilian and police variations here

Early civilian models only had a speedometer; later civilian models had speedometer and tachometer See civilian and police variations here

Civilian models had speedometer and tachometer See civilian and police variations here

Battery covers

Narrow, non louvered

Early models had narrow, non louvered; later models had wider, louvered

Wider, louvered

Tool boxes

Knobs

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Early models had knobs

Later models had locks

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Locks

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Coil

Magneti Marelli

Early models had Magneti Marelli; later models had Bosch

Bosch

Coil mount

Across the frame

In line with frame

Civilian frame

Narrower backbone (later tank will fit on earlier frame, but not vice versa)

Wider backbone

Police frame (in addition to civilian frame differences)

Siren mount (mechanical sirens had different mounts than electrical - not sure of difference???), stronger gusset plate for seat, gusset plate drilled for rear crash bars, dimple in rear fender mount at the rearmost part of the frame

Generator

Magneti Marelli

Early models had Magneti Marelli, later models had Bosch

Bosch

Generator covers

Two individual metal plates (most painted, there is some debate as to whether or not some were chromed)

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Direct link to image

Early models had two individual metal plates (most painted, there is some debate as to whether or not some were chromed)

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Later models had a single black plastic cover

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

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Single black plastic cover

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Photo courtesy of Charlie Mullendore of Antietam Classic Cycle.

Direct link to image

Regulator

Magneti Marelli

Early models had Magneti Marelli; later models had Bosch

Bosch

Starter

Magneti Marelli

Early models had Magneti Marelli; later models had Bosch

Bosch

Center stand

Short feet

Early models had short feet; later models had long curved feet

Long curved feet

Turn signals

None

Front and rear

Fender reflectors

None

Early models had none; later models has reflectors with wide chrome trim; some very late models had reflectors with very narrow trim

Early models had reflectors with wide chrome trim; later models had reflectors with very narrow trim

Fork covers / headlight ears

Shorter

Shorter for all drum brake models. Disc brake models are longer.

Swing arm

Aluminum cap on the back end of the swing arm...just before the rear drive

Boss that could be drilled for aluminum cap

No boss.

Hand levers

Smooth lever with a perch that angled toward the handlebar

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

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Early models used a smooth lever with a perch that angled toward the handlebar

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

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Later models used a finger-grooved lever with a perch that was more square to the handlebar

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

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Finger-grooved lever with a perch that was more square to the handlebar

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

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Models with 4 leading shoe front brakes used a finger-grooved lever with a special adapter to connect both front brake cables

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

Photo courtesy of eBay auction.

Direct link to image

Shocks

Thanks to Newtin for providing this difference information. Note: the shocks must be completely disassembled to remove the chrome cover; the plastic cover can be distorted to clear the tabs at the bottom of the shock body.

Early models had a black plastic inner cover to hide the rod

Photo courtesy of Newtin.

Photo courtesy of Newtin.

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Later models used a chrome steel cover to hide the rod

Photo courtesy of Newtin.

Photo courtesy of Newtin.

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Early models used a chrome steel cover to hide the rod

Photo courtesy of Newtin.

Photo courtesy of Newtin.

Direct link to image

Later models had a black plastic inner cover to hide the rod

Photo courtesy of Newtin.

Photo courtesy of Newtin.

Direct link to image

All used a black plastic inner cover to hide the rod

Photo courtesy of Newtin.

Photo courtesy of Newtin.

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Seats

Dual seat.

If used in police service, a solo seat was likely fitted.

Dual seat.

If used in police service, a solo seat was likely fitted.

Dual seat.

If used in police service, a solo seat was likely fitted.

Dual seat.

If used in police service, a solo seat was likely fitted.

Buddy seat.

Dual seat.

If used in police service, a solo seat was likely fitted.

Solo seat.

Foot rests

Foot pegs.

Foot pegs.

If used in police service, footboards were likely fitted.

Foot pegs.

If used in police service, footboards were likely fitted.

Foot pegs.

If used in police service, footboards were likely fitted.

Footboards.

Foot pegs.

If used in police service, footboards were likely fitted.

Footboards.